Building & Carpentry Learning Library

Tools for the Building and Carpentry Trades

This course describes many of the most common tools used by builders and carpenters. Their uses, general characteristics, attachments, and safety and operating features, including maintenance, are outlined.


Carpentry Materials and Methods

This series of lessons deal with (1) the types, sources, uses, and characteristics of the common woods used on various construction projects, (2) the various methods and joints associated with woodworking, and (3) the different types of fastening devices.


Rough Carpentry

In this series of lessons deal with framing the various components of a building. Topics include sill framing, floor framing, sill framing, wall framing, and floor framing. There is also instruction in constructing and placing the ceiling framing, and using the framing square to calculate and measure cuts for the roof framing.


Finish Carpentry

Finish carpentry is undertaken after rough carpentry is completed. Topics in this series of lessons include doorframing, installing hardware for doors, window casing, moldings at the ceiling and floor, as well as other decorative treatments Installing millwork, including cabinets and tops, is also part of this program.


Finishes

In this series of lessons, you will  learn about the finishes that make a building durable, habitable, and pleasing to look at. You will learn about topics ranging from exterior finishes and trim to interior wall finishes, including drywall, plaster, ceramic tile, paint, and paneling. There are also discussions and descriptions of acoustic ceilings and various floor finishes, including wood flooring, resilient flooring, and carpeting. There are also notes on the use of hazardous materials.


Moisture Protection

This series of lessons cover the many aspects of moisture protection: (1) roofing finishes, from sheathing to underlayment to final finishes such as shingles and built-up roofing, (2) exterior wall finishes, including different types of siding, (3) flashing, gutters and downspouts, (4) installing doors and windows, including glazing windows, and (4) insulation and ventilation


Masonry Construction (Basic)

This is the first of two units of study for masonry construction. This Basic unit is appropriate for people considering masonry construction as a skilled-trade career and for active apprentices.

Topics covered in this  unit include masonry tools and equipment, concrete masonry, and brick masonry.

 Masonry Construction (Advanced)

This is an advanced unit of study for masonry construction. The lessons cover the construction techniques of laying brick, structural clay tile, and stone, and the estimating procedures associated with concrete masonry units (CMUs).

A good understanding of basic algebra is required.

Note: This Advanced unit is not simply a continuation of the Basic version (above). Whereas the Basic version is appropriate for beginners and apprentice studies, the Advanced version is more suitable for experienced journeymen who are looking forward to a master's status or a position in construction management.


Concrete Construction (Basic)

This series of lessons covers the characteristics of concrete, its ingredients, its mix designs, and how to mix it, as well as the forming, placement, finishing, and curing of concrete. It also covers the placement of reinforcing steel and the types of ties required to ensure that the reinforcing doesn’t move once positioned. Concrete construction joints and the concrete saw are also covered. Then we’ll conclude the series with a discussion of precast and tilt-up concrete.

This Basic unit is appropriate for people considering concrete construction as a skilled-trade career and for active apprentices.

Concrete Construction (Advanced)

This selection of lessons explains some of the major factors in the design of concrete forms, as well as the various methods by which you can select the proportions for quality concrete mixtures and adjust these mixtures to suit job requirements. We also cover types and uses of admixtures and slump testing procedures. We point out some of the types of equipment you are likely to encounter in concrete construction. A brief discussion is also included on precast construction.

A good understanding of basic algebra is required.

Note: This Advanced unit is not simply a continuation of the Basic version (above). Whereas the Basic version is appropriate for beginners and apprentice studies, the Advanced version is more suitable for experienced journeymen who are looking forward to a master's status or a position in construction management.


Properties and Uses of Metal (Advanced)

This series describes how to identify the various metals and their properties. You will also learn how to describe corrosion resistance and identify different types of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, and how to use simple tests to help identify common metals.

Layout and Fabrication of Structural Steel and Pipe (Advanced)

This series of lessons discusses how to identify the various metals and their properties. You will also learn how to describe corrosion resistance and identify different types of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, and how to use simple tests to help identify common metals.

Fabrication and Placement of Reinforcing Steel (Advanced)

This series of lessons describes the purpose of using reinforcing steel in concrete construction, the shapes of reinforcing steel commonly used, and the techniques and tools used by Steelworkers in rebar (reinforcing steel) work.

Basic algebra and geometry are required for a complete understanding of this series.

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